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This Is Why We Stand: A Documentary by Joe Archino


“The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here.” – President Abraham Lincoln, Gettysburg Address, November 19, 1863.

This Is Why We Stand

Part I

Forever guided by Old Glory, Americans have stood firm across battlefields past and present, forging the fires of freedom in every corner of the world. Whether Lexington and Concord, or Yorktown, or Pearl Harbor, or Omaha Beach, the pages of our history are filled with the names of places where great sacrifices were made to secure the precious liberties we enjoy today. There are many sacred places that hold a special reverence in the hearts and minds of the American people, but Gettysburg, Pennsylvania is truly a hallowed ground unlike any other. As one of the nation’s foremost historians of the American Civil War, James M. McPherson wrote, “Perhaps no word in the American language has greater historical resonance than Gettysburg.”

On July 1-3, 1863, General Robert Edward Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia and General George Gordon Meade’s Army of the Potomac clashed at the crossroads town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Lee’s army entered the Battle of Gettysburg at the height of its power and with his invincible troops; the Confederate commander was determined to achieve a war-winning victory. When the battle that many believed would determine the war began, Meade was only in his fourth day as the commander of the Army of the Potomac. The fate of America’s future rested on Meade’s shoulders and he proved that he was the right man for the job.

Lee’s army got the better of the Union on July 1, and although Federal troops were forced to retreat through Gettysburg, they rallied on the pivotal high ground south of town. On July 2 and 3, General Lee aimed to finish off the Army of the Potomac, but Meade and his men maintained a strong defensive position and beat back some of the most furious Confederate attacks of the entire war. In the end, the Blue stood victorious over the Gray.

Under Meade’s guidance, the soldiers of the Army of the Potomac achieved a victory that when combined with General Ulysses S. Grant’s triumph at Vicksburg, Mississippi, turned the tide of the war toward ultimate victory for the Union.

With an estimated 51,000 casualties across both sides, 28,000 for Lee and 23,000 for Meade, the three-day struggle at Gettysburg was the bloodiest battle of the Civil War.

In his address at the dedication of the cemetery for Union soldiers killed in the Battle of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln said, “The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here.”

While much time has passed since that fateful battle, we must always remember Lincoln’s words and honor those who gave the last full measure of devotion so that the nation could experience a “new birth of freedom” and so that “government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

Part II – Honor to Old Glory

Since 2016, the National Football League has had a crisis on its hands. The decision by certain players to kneel during the playing of America’s national anthem, “The Star-Spangled Banner,” to protest social injustice has not only divided football fans, but also most Americans throughout the country. While every loyal American should be committed to the pursuit of liberty and justice for all, it is important to remember that when the anthem is played, we stand together to honor the flag that unites us and connects us to our past. After all, history reminds us that Old Glory is the ultimate symbol of sacrifice.

From Gettysburg and beyond, the American flag has been carried into battle, bearing witness to the events that have shaped our nation and eternally watching over our honored dead. Just as our warriors have stood and worked together to overcome some of history’s greatest challenges, we too must follow in their footsteps. Regardless of the obstacles that we face as a society, the flag must always be revered and respected. By heeding President Lincoln’s words and remembering the individual stories of the great sacrifices made at Gettysburg, it is clear why we must never waver in our devotion to Old Glory. This Is Why We Stand.

Part III – The Heroes of Gettysburg

On the morning of July 1, 1863, the Iron Brigade of the West marched towards Gettysburg and was quickly thrown into the unfolding battle. Distinguished by their tall black felt hats, and composed of the Second, Sixth, Seventh Wisconsin, Nineteenth Indiana, and the Twenty-fourth Michigan, the soldiers of the Iron Brigade were some of the stoutest fighters in the Army of the Potomac.

Lieutenant Colonel Rufus R. Dawes led the Sixth Wisconsin against Confederate troops who took cover in an unfinished railroad cut. Dawes described that during the chaotic fight, “Men [were] being shot by twenties and thirties and breaking ranks by falling or running. But the boys… crowded in right and left toward the colors and went forward.”

Like the Sixth Wisconsin, the other four regiments of the Iron Brigade also faced a relentless fight and suffered heavy casualties. As the historian Lance J. Herdegen records, “The Iron Brigade of the West carried 1,883 men into the battle and by the end of July 1, 1863, only 671 were reported in the ranks-a percentage loss of more than 64.3.”

While the first day’s fighting ended in defeat for the Union, the Confederates might have won the battle then and there had it not been for the determined stand made by the Iron Brigade and other Federal troops. Leading by example, the Black Hats fought with a fierceness that allowed the rest of the army to retire to the high ground south of town, a move that contributed to the Army of the Potomac’s eventual victory on July 3. The Battle of Gettysburg was the Iron Brigade’s finest hour, and for far too many Westerners, it was also tragically their final hour.

Whether the soldiers of the Iron Brigade, or the 262 men of the 1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry Regiment, who suffered a casualty rate of 82 percent after charging an entire Alabama brigade of 1,500 men during a pivotal moment of the battle, or even a dog named Sallie who remained on the battlefield, refusing to abandon the dead and wounded of the regiment that had received her when she was just a puppy, Gettysburg was filled with heroes, North and South alike. The heroes of Gettysburg helped shape the world that we live in today, and they must always be remembered. By honoring our flag, we preserve our connection to those who gave the last full measure of devotion. As long as we never take their sacrifices for granted, their memories and legacies will live on forever through the enduring power of Old Glory.

Part IV – Lessons To Remember

From Gettysburg and beyond, our nation’s warriors have always kept our flag moving forward. Now more than ever, we must carefully listen to the words of those who have faithfully served the United States of America. Our veterans have much to teach us about what it truly means to be an American.

Vincent J. Speranza

Living in a world at war, Vincent J. Speranza joined the United States Army in November 1943, shortly after graduating from high school. As a nineteen-year-old, Speranza eventually found himself serving as a machine gunner in Company H, 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, fighting in a foxhole in Bastogne, Belgium during the pivotal Battle of the Bulge. He served 144 days in combat during World War II, and in every moment of adversity, Speranza always remembered the meaningful words that his father told him and his brothers.

Vincent J. Speranza audio transcript: “Hopefully, because he said to us, ‘this nation must not fail’, that we felt we led our lives in that mode. That whatever we do, we should be sure to make sure that this nation does not fail. That’s what stayed with me, especially in battle. When people ask you, what were you thinking about? Well there was a lot of things you were thinking about. One of the major things you thought about was your father saying, ‘hey, this country must not fail.’”

Like Vincent J. Speranza, we too must do whatever it takes to make sure that this nation does not fail.

Armando “Chick” Galella

Armando “Chick” Galella enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1940 and eventually found himself serving with the 443rd Signal Corps at Hickam Field, adjacent to U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor on the island of Oahu in Hawaii. Galella survived the devastating Japanese attack against Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. He never forgot what happened on that “date which will live in infamy,” and reminds us why we must always ensure that the brave men and women who defend our nation are properly supported.

Armando “Chick” Galella audio transcript: “Devastation you wouldn’t believe. You wouldn’t believe what they did. Those men had no more chance than a snowball had in hell. We were not prepared, and that’s why I say to the government today, get them prepared our soldiers. The men and women in the service. Get them prepared. Don’t let that happen again to us.”

Following Armando “Chick” Galella’s example, we must work tirelessly so that those who serve our nation always have everything they need to be primed for success and are prepared for every situation.

Ben DeFonce

Ben DeFonce joined the United States Marine Corps at nineteen years old and served during the Korean War. As a combat veteran who was wounded three times in battle, DeFonce faced struggles very similar to the ones that are affecting our warriors returning from war today. He is committed to doing whatever he can to help his fellow veterans heal from the wounds of war.

Ben DeFonce audio transcript: “I stepped on a land mine, and when I got out, it was hard for me to walk for a few years. So I tell these guys, whatever you went through, I’ve been there already. You have posttraumatic stress? I had it too. So just get your life together. Respect your parents and your home. Enjoy your life. Sit down and have a cup of coffee with me. Come and eat with me. Whatever it takes.”

Like Ben DeFonce, we too must always be there for our veterans and do whatever it takes to help our warriors heal from the wounds of war.

Thomas J. Giorgi

When his country called upon him to serve during the Vietnam War, Thomas J. Giorgi stood up and was prepared to do his duty as a soldier in the United States Army. On July 3, 1966, Private First Class Giorgi and his unit were ambushed by a numerically superior enemy force. In the chaotic firefight that followed, many of Giorgi’s comrades went down, including his squad leader. Noticing that his squad leader was wounded and lying face down next to an abandoned enemy foxhole, Giorgi exposed himself to heavy enemy fire, raced to the position, administered first aid, and tenaciously defended the position until the medic arrived. The enemy continued to apply relentless pressure, and despite being surrounded and severely wounded, Giorgi continued to hold on until help arrived some 3 hours later.

46 years after this battle, Giorgi was awarded the Silver Star, the third-highest military combat decoration that can be awarded to a member of the United States Armed Forces for gallantry in action. In the face of the enemy onslaught, Giorgi faithfully stood by and supported his comrades through it all.

Thomas Giorgi audio transcript: “When I saw Garcia down on the ground it was just something inner in me. I was in the medical profession. I was becoming an x-ray technician. This is what I wanted to do with my life was help people, so when I saw him needing help, I I knew I had to do something and I just acted. And lots of times that’s what happens in combat. You don’t stop and think. You just use your training and your instincts and you just hope what you’re doing is right.”

Following Thomas J. Giorgi’s example, we too must always have the courage to faithfully stand by and support our brothers and sisters in arms until the very end.

Mike Doody

Displaying the same unwavering commitment to serving the United States as the incredible veterans who came before him, Mike Doody stood up to defend his nation in the wake of the terrorist attacks that shook America to her core on September 11, 2001. After enlisting in the United States Army at the age of 22 in 2007, Doody served three deployments to Afghanistan. Over the course of those deployments, he fought and bled beside his fellow Americans. Recounting his experience at a ramp ceremony for warriors who gave the last full measure of devotion and whose remains were about to be sent back home, Doody reminds us why Old Glory means everything to the men and women who faithfully serve our nation.

Mike Doody audio transcript: “When the birds finally landed, there were various leaders who were carrying the soldiers towards them to put them on and bring them back home. And what I remember distinctly was that there was an American flag with each of these men. It never mattered what race or gender or creed or religion someone was, everyone in the military is a family.”

Taking Mike Doody’s words to heart, we must never forget that Old Glory is the ultimate symbol of sacrifice, and just as the Stars and Stripes bind our military together as a family, the flag also unites each American citizen together as members of one unbreakable nation.

Part V. Always Be Faithful

Whether studying the history of our people at places like Gettysburg or learning from the experiences of our veterans who participated in the conflicts that have shaped our modern world, it is abundantly clear that we owe our lives to the generations of Americans who have stood up to defend our nation. In life, those warriors were guided by Old Glory, and for the valiant titans who gave the last full measure of devotion; the flag continues to eternally watch over them. By standing together to honor the American flag, we truly preserve the memories and legacies of all our heroes of history. So long as we never break faith with Old Glory, they will always be standing by, dutifully watching over us from above and helping to guide us towards a brighter future as “one Nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.” This Is Why We Stand.

Music Credits

"Going Home" by Mary Fahl. From the album The Other Side of Time.

"Main Title" by Randy Edelman. From the album Gettysburg.

"Men of Honor" by Randy Edelman. From the album Gettysburg.

"Over the Fence" by Randy Edelman. From the Album Gettysburg.

"Killer Angel" by Randy Edelman. From the album Gettysburg.

"Reunion and Finale" by Randy Edelman. From the album Gettysburg.

Photo and Video Citation List

Open

1. The State of Maryland Monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Video Credit: Joe Archino)

Part I: Introduction

2. Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima by Joe Rosenthal. (Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons/Public Domain)

3. Lexington Minuteman Statue. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

4. “Officers from the 101st Airborne Division pose after the now-infamous Battle of Bastogne.” (Photo Credit: U.S. Army)

5. “USS Arizona interment of Estelle Birdsell.” (Photo Credit: Brett Seymour/National Park Service)

6. Gouverneur Warren monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

7. Eternal Light Peace Memorial at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Video Credit: Joe Archino)

8. 72nd Pennsylvania monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

9. The North Carolina Monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Video Credit: Joe Archino)

10. The State of Virginia monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

11. General George G. Meade monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

12. The State of Virginia monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

13. Oliver O. Howard monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Video Credit: Joe Archino)

14. Robert E. Lee/ State of Virginia monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

15. Cannon at Gettysburg National Military Park/Little Round Top. (Video Credit: Joe Archino)

16. 78th and 102nd New York Monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

17. William Wells monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Photo: Joe Archino)

18. General George G. Meade monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Video Credit: Joe Archino)

19. Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial at Gettysburg National Cemetery. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

20. Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address Memorial at Gettysburg National Cemetery. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

21. Gettysburg Address Memorial and Abraham Lincoln statue in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania on Baltimore Street. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

22. Abraham Lincoln Emancipation Proclamation Statue at Gettysburg College. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

23. 140th New York Infantry monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Video Credit: Joe Archino)

24. 88th Pennsylvania Infantry monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

Part II: Honor to Old Glory

25. Alonzo Cushing monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

26. The American Flag at Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara, California. (Photo Credit: Pxhere.com/Public Domain)

27. Old Glory at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

28. “The Flag Draped Coffins of American Soldiers Lay Side by Side in a Mass Grave at a Military Funeral Ceremony at the Madingly U.S. Army Cemetery at Cambridge, England.” (Photo Credit: National Archives)

29. Marine Lieutenant Colonel Richard P. Ross, planting the American flag on a parapet of Shuri Castle, located in the relentlessly contested southern region of the island of Okinawa. (Photo Credit: USMC Archives)

30. “American flags flutter gently in the breeze at Arlington National Cemetery, placed there to honor the service and sacrifice of the nation’s fallen service members.” (Photo Credit: Sgt. Jose A. Torres Jr/U.S. Army)

31. 73rd New York monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

32. Old Glory at Iwo Jima. (Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons/Public Domain)

33. 116th Pennsylvania infantry monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

34. 4th Michigan Infantry monument. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

Part III. The Heroes of Gettysburg

35. 96th Pennsylvania Infantry monument. (Video Credit: Joe Archino)

36. John Buford monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

37. 24th Michigan Infantry monument. (Video Credit: Joe Archino)

38. 6th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry monument. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

39. The Railroad Cut at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

40. The Railroad Cut by Dale Gallon. (Photo Credit: Photo scanned from a print of the work purchased by Joe Archino)

41. 7th Wisconsin Infantry monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

42. 24th Michigan Infantry monument. (Video Credit: Joe Archino)

43. 24th Michigan Infantry monument. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

44. The State of Virginia monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Video Credit: Joe Archino)

45. 24th Michigan Infantry monument. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

46. 2nd Wisconsin Infantry monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

47. 1st Pennsylvania Light Artillery Batteries F and G (Rickett’s Battery) monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Video Credit: Joe Archino)

48. 24th Michigan Infantry monument. (Video Credit: Joe Archino)

49. 1st Minnesota Infantry monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

50. 1st Minnesota Infantry monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

51. 11th Pennsylvania Infantry monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

52. 11th Pennsylvania Infantry monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

53. The State of Maryland Monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

54. 83rd Pennsylvania monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

55. Alonzo Cushing monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Video Credit: Joe Archino)

Part IV. Lessons to Remember

56. Barlow’s Knoll at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

57. “An overhead shot of the 41st Engineers taken during WWII.” (Photo Credit: National Archives/U.S. Army)

58. This Is Why We Stand interview with Jerry Morano. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

59. This Is Why We Stand interview with Janus Persaud, Armando “Chick” Galella, and Mike Doody. (Photo Credit: Mike Doody)

60. This Is Why We Stand interview with Vincent J. Speranza. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

61. Private First Class Vincent J. Speranza. (Photo Credit: silive.com)

62. Vincent J. Speranza inspecting an M249 machine gun at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska on October 6, 2013. (Photo Credit: Jeffrey Smith/U.S. Army)

63. Vincent J. Speranza at the exact spot of his former foxhole that he fought from during the Battle of the Bulge. (Photo Credit: Staff Sgt. Bernardo Fuller/U.S. Army)

64. Vincent J. Speranza participating in a ceremony to commemorate the 71st anniversary of the Battle of the Bulge. (Photo Credit: Staff Sgt. Bernardo Fuller/U.S. Army)

65. Vincent J. Speranza as a guest of the Alaska National Guard. (Photo Credit: Jeffrey Smith/U.S. Army)

66. Vincent J. Speranza salutes Old Glory at the 17th Airborne Division Memorial in Bertogne, Belgium. (Photo Credit: Staff Sgt. Bernardo Fuller/U.S. Army)

67. Vincent J. Speranza interviewed about his service with the 101st Airborne Division during the Battle of the Bulge. (Photo Credit: Staff Sgt. Bernardo Fuller/U.S. Army)

68. This Is Why We Stand interview with Armando “Chick” Galella. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

69. An aerial view of Hickam Field in May 1940. (Photo Credit: World War II Database)

70. The USS Arizona burning after the Japanese attack against Pearl Harbor. (Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons/Public Domain)

71. Armando “Chick” Galella participates in a ceremony to commemorate the 76th Anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor. (Photo Credit: Stephanie Keith/Getty Images North America)

72. Armando “Chick” Galella participates in a ceremony to commemorate the 77th Anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor. (Photo Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

73. The USS West Virginia burning after the Japanese attack against Pearl Harbor. (Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons/Public Domain)

74. Hickam Field Under Attack on December 7, 1941. (Photo Credit: Photoshot/Newscom)

75. Armando “Chick” Galella participates in a ceremony to commemorate the 76th Anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor. (Photo Credit: Stephanie Keith/Getty Images North America)

76. This Is Why We Stand Ben DeFonce interview. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

77. Ben DeFonce featured on a story about Harrison, New York honoring Purple Heart recipients with a plaque outside its municipal building. (Photo Credit: News 12 Westchester)

78. Ben DeFonce featured on a story about Harrison, New York honoring Purple Heart recipients with a plaque outside its municipal building. (Photo Credit: News 12 Westchester)

79. Ben DeFonce featured on a story about Harrison, New York honoring Purple Heart recipients with a plaque outside its municipal building. (Photo Credit: News 12 Westchester)

80. This Is Why We Stand Ben DeFonce interview. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

81. This Is Why We Stand Thomas Giorgi interview. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

82. Thomas J. Giorgi with his family before deploying to Vietnam. (Photo Credit: Thomas J. Giorgi)

83. A photograph showing part of the battlefield where Giorgi and his unit engaged the enemy on July 3, 1966. (Photo Credit: Thomas J. Giorgi)

84. Thomas J. Giorgi’s unit engaging the enemy on July 3, 1966. (Photo Credit: Thomas J. Giorgi)

85. Thomas J. Giorgi during the Vietnam War. (Photo Credit: Thomas J. Giorgi. (Photo Credit: Thomas J. Giorgi)

86. Thomas J. Giorgi during the Vietnam War. (Photo Credit: Thomas J. Giorgi. (Photo Credit: Thomas J. Giorgi)

87. Medical assistance arrives to help Giorgi and his comrades on July 3, 1966. (Photo Credit: Thomas J. Giorgi)

88. Thomas J. Giorgi receiving the Silver Star for his actions on July 3, 1966. (Photo Credit: Thomas J. Giorgi)

89. Thomas J. Giorgi during the Vietnam War. (Photo Credit: Thomas J. Giorgi. (Photo Credit: Thomas J. Giorgi)

90. Thomas J. Giorgi receiving the Purple Heart and recovering from the wounds he suffered on July 3, 1966. (Photo Credit: Thomas J. Giorgi)

91. Thomas J. Giorgi participating in a ceremony in Port Chester, New York after returning home from the Vietnam War. (Photo Credit: Thomas J. Giorgi)

92. This Is Why We Stand interview with Mike Doody. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

93. Mike Doody with Old Glory. (Photo Credit: Mike Doody)

94. Mike Doody during a deployment to Afghanistan. (Photo Credit: Mike Doody)

95. Mike Doody and comrades photographed together during a deployment to Afghanistan. (Photo Credit: Mike Doody)

96. Mike Doody and his comrades gathered together during a ceremony to honor the fallen. (Photo Credit: Mike Doody)

97. “A ramp ceremony honors eight fallen soldiers of the 5th Stryker Brigade Combat Team (SBCT), held at Kandahar Airfield on October 28, 2009 as they are loaded onto a USAF C-17 Globemaster III destined for the unit’s home in Fort Lewis, Washington.” (Photo Credit: Tech. Sgt. Francisco V. Govea II/USAF)

98. “American flags, placed with care in front of gravestones, pay tribute to fallen service members at Arlington National Cemetery. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army)

99. Mike Doody and comrades photographed together during a deployment to Afghanistan. (Photo Credit: Mike Doody)

100. United We Win poster. (Photo Credit: The National Archives)

Part V. Always Be Faithful

101. Samuel W. Crawford monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

102. 4th New York Independent Battery monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

103. Vincent J. Speranza points to the spot of his former foxhole that he fought from during the Battle of the Bulge. (Photo Credit: Staff Sgt. Bernardo Fuller/U.S. Army)

104. American troops assaulting Omaha Beach on D-Day, June 6, 1944. (Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons/Public Domain)

105. The Twentieth Maine by H. Charles McBarron. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army)

106. American flags placed at Gettysburg National Cemetery to honor the Union soldiers buried there. (Photo: Gettysburg Daily)

107. American flags placed at Gettysburg National Cemetery to honor the Union soldiers buried there. (Photo: Gettysburg Daily)

108. “Old Guard Soldiers place a flag in front of Audie Murphy’s gravestone then salute the Soldier, who held every medal for courage and bravery the Army has. (Photo Credit: J.D. Leipold/U.S. Army)

109. Americans will always fight for liberty poster. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

110. Washington Crossing the Delaware by Emanuel Leutze. (Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons/Public Domain)

End Credits

111. Gouverneur Warren monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Video Credit: Joe Archino)

112. 96th Pennsylvania Infantry monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

113. Eternal Light Peace Memorial at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

114. Winfield S. Hancock monument at Gettysburg National Military Park. (Video Credit: Joe Archino)

115. Joe Archino credit graphic. (Photo Credit: Joe Archino)

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